Kudzu bugs – Nuisance to the humans as well

“Kudzu bug: New bad bug appears in southern states” – Daily Press

Why there’s so much of havoc spread due to these bugs?

Although known to feed on Kudzu plant, they have started causing nuisance in human dwellings as well.

The spread of kudzu bug began when the Kudzu plant, a native to Japan was imported to the Southern United States in the 1800’s to enrich soil depleted by tobacco.

The import of the plant brought bugs along with it to the States and this is how the pesky bugs started spreading all over.

The kudzu bug is also found in some Eastern states, particularly Tennessee, as well as Florida, Alabama, North and South Carolina.

The plant, kudzu is often planted to reduce erosion, but, despite its name, the kudzu bug eats more than just this plant. The bugs also feed on soybeans and can dramatically impact crop production. It chews into the veins of a plant’s leaves to suck out nutrients, causing the leaves to dry out and wither and the plan to lose nutrition.

These bugs are approximately 4 to 6 mm long as adults.  They are a mottled green and brown color. Many people mistake them for beetles, but they can easily be differentiated by their beaklike piercing-sucking mouthparts. The bug has a hard shield and is sometimes confused with stink bugs too.

The kudzu bug feeds and lay eggs through summer into the fall, then seeks out sheltered areas where it can pass the winter, such as under bark or rocks, or in leaf litter, or behind siding or in gaps or cracks of buildings.

The kudzu bug can become a very annoying pest of homes. Homeowners usually are more concerned with kudzu bugs because of their overwintering habits. During the warm summer months, people do not see the bugs. Once fall temperatures start dropping, kudzu bugs congregate in massive numbers on sun-exposed surfaces to warm themselves.

The mass sightings of the adults are the most disturbing sign for homeowners. If large numbers are disturbed, they can produce a strong odor. Host plants also may show sign of damage as the bugs feed.

Next, they locate sheltered voids, cracks, and crevices to survive the winter, which can include people’s homes. Once indoors, they do not feed or reproduce. They are dormant during the winter, unless there is a warm day, and will vacate the building with the warmth of the spring. It is attracted to white surfaces such as the walls of houses or white vehicles, because of the high reflectance of the white surfaces as it relates to the bugs’ simple eyes.

The CBS news says that Native “Asian Kudzu Bugs Threaten Crops in Maryland”

By Alex DeMetrick July 26, 2013
BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Right on the heels of the Asian stinkbug invasion comes a new pest. This one’s called the kudzu bug.

Alex DeMetrick reports–it packs a real potential for trouble.

The kudzu vine spread up from the deep south into Maryland years ago. But now something new has arrived: The kudzu bug.

A native of Asia, it hitched a ride with cargo imported to Georgia in 2009. Although small, it breeds in huge numbers. And it’s not pleasant.

“We do have reports from the south of them staining furniture, drapery, wall coverings,” said Dr. Mike Raupp, University of Maryland entomologist. “And if you handle these things, they will stain your skin. And in some cases, they can actually cause severe skin irritation. So this is not going to be a good performer.”

The university of Georgia reports that the Kudzu bug are spreading rapidly across Southern states

By Sharon Dowdy, University of Georgia- SouthEast Farm Press | Aug 29, 2011

The bean plataspid, or kudzu bug, munch on kudzu and soybeans and has now set up residence in four Southern states.  Homeowners consider the bug a nuisance. Soybean producers shudder at the damage it causes. And many are hoping it will prove to be a kudzu killer.

Almost two years ago, a tiny immigrant pest arrived in Georgia, and there’s nothing the state’s immigration office can do to make it leave.

The bean plataspid, or kudzu bug, munch on kudzu and soybeans and has now set up residence in four Southern states.

Homeowners consider the bug a nuisance. Soybean producers shudder at the damage it causes. And many are hoping it will prove to be a kudzu killer.

Many pest control methods are used to stop the menace caused by Kudzu bugs, but all of them have proved ineffective.

This is a situation where the menace is increasing and the conventional methods used to stop the menace are proving useless.

In such a situation an effective method is needed which provides protection from the menace caused by the Kudzu bug and hence C Tech Corporation has introduced an insect aversive named TermirepelTM.

TermirepelTM is an extremely low toxic, non-hazardous, non-mutagenic and non-carcinogenic anti-insect aversive.

TermirepelTM is developed on green technology and chemistry. It is effective against a broad spectrum of insects such as Kudzu bugs, wasps, whiteflies, termites, beetles etc.

TermirepelTM works on the mechanism of fear, discomfort, aversion, mating disruption, oviposition deterrence and feeding disruption.

Masterbatch is to be incorporated with polymers while processing them and can be used for producing agricultural film, pipes, wires and cables, polymeric parts for agricultural utilities, automobile parts etc.

The liquid concentrate is to be mixed with paints in a proper ratio and can be applied to interior and exterior of houses, offices, areas of mass transits etc.

Since the Kudzu bugs are found in the areas like roof spaces, plywood built spaces, eaves, ceilings etc. places we need to repel them from such places. Our lacquer form product can be applied on wooden applications to which the pests are attracted the most. The lacquer is compatible with a variety of surfaces like metal, polymer, ceramics, wood, concrete etc.

TermirepelTM is the best protection against the Kudzu bugs!

Contact us at technical.martketing@ctechcorporation.com to get best solutions on pest nuisance

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